A Collective Nouns List for Your Homeschool

A Collective Nouns List

Have you ever heard of a fluther of jellyfish?

How about a clutter of spiders?

A scourge of mosquitoes?

That last one makes sense. If you’ve ever been bitten by a mosquito, you’ll know that it feels like a scourge.

But I digress.

My reason for asking you about the jellyfish, spiders, and mosquitoes isn’t to give you a lesson in Biology. It’s actually to share with you some

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20 Things Your Preschooler Can Learn in the Kitchen

20 Things Your Preschooler Can Do in the Kitchen

One thing I always liked about homeschooling is that it makes it easy to take everyday activities and make them into learning experiences.

This is especially true for preschoolers. You can take something as commonplace as cooking and use it to teach important preschool skills and concepts such as cutting and counting.

If you’re looking for some inspiration on how to use the kitchen as a classroom with your four-year-old,

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Holy Saturday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Holy Saturday

Today we look at the final poem in our Holy Week Classic Poetry Series.

This poem is actually for Easter Sunday rather than Holy Saturday today. I figured that you would probably be too busy with family and Easter activities to read a poem tomorrow. So you can spend some time today exploring this piece if you like.

The title of the poem is “Easter Day.” It was written by

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Good Friday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Good Friday

Good Friday was a sad day.

It’s the day that Jesus was beaten and whipped and mocked.

It’s the day that Our Lord was forced to carry a huge cross to through the streets of Jerusalem.

It’s the day that Our Savior was crucified and died.

Good Friday was a very sad day.

Remembering these events can make Good Friday a sad day for us here today.

In times of sorrow, we often seek consolation. We look for something to

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Maundy Thursday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Maundy Thursday

Today is Maundy Thursday and we have another poem for you. But before we get into that, let’s take a look at some of the events that took place that Thursday before the crucifixion and at the meaning behind the word “maundy.”

On that Thursday evening, Jesus celebrated a final Passover meal with his disciples. This is known as the Last Supper. (Matthew 26:17-30)

Afterward, he washed the feet of his disciples. (John 13:4-20) This was a sort of hands-on lesson for them about

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Half Off Sale and Giveaway

Half Off Sale and Giveaway

Teachers Notebook is having a sitewide sale and we’re joining in the fun!

Today through April 19th, 2014, all of the products in our Warm Hearts Publishing shop will be half off.

That includes our puzzles, copywork, Reader’s Theater, and more!

On top of that 50% off, Teachers Notebook is offering an

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Spy Wednesday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Spy Wednesday

The Wednesday of Holy Week used to be called Spy Wednesday. That’s because it is the day that Judas Iscariot (the spy) was paid 30 silver pieces to betray Jesus to the chief priests. (Matthew 26:14-16)

The betrayal and crucifixion of Jesus were horrible events in that time in history. But, as the poem today suggests, God can bring good from evil. Jesus was resurrected 3 days after his death on the cross. He opened up the gates of Heaven for us. Those are the

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Holy Tuesday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Holy Tuesday

Some people think that Jesus spent a good deal of time on Holy Tuesday teaching. (Matthew 21 through 25) It’s more than likely that he did. And while some people listened to his teachings, like his disciples, others were not so receptive. People like the Pharisees and Sadducees, for example, did not listen to what Jesus taught.

Being a good listener is an important part of being a good Christian. We should “listen,” so to speak, to the teachings of Jesus in the Bible. We should listen to

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Fig Monday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Fig Monday

In the past, the Monday of Holy Week was referred to as Fig Monday. It alludes to the time when Christ cursed the fig tree that wasn’t producing any fruit. (Matthew 21: 18-22)

The last verse in this passage is an especially powerful one.

“And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive.”

What an incredible promise that is! How kind and generous is our God to listen to and answer our prayers!

But the cursing of the fig tree isn’t the

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Holy Week Classic Poetry – Palm Sunday

Holy Week Classic Poetry Palm Sunday

Holy Week begins on Palm Sunday. It is the day we celebrate Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. (Matthew 21:1-11)

The poem we’ll begin with is aptly named “Palm Sunday.” It was written by John Keble in the 1800′s. Keble was a theologian and poet who was educated by his father. He was educated so well, in fact, that he received a scholarship to his father’s college, Corpus Christi, in Oxford, England. He was later

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